Wednesday, March 14, 2007

Aristotle's Resignation on Filipino Democracy

Previous to the Fair Elections Act, TV ads as a medium for campaign were limited by the Omnibus Election Code. After its institution, we see among ourselves campaign cum commercial ads spawning in our TV screens and few days later a list of the top spenders who shelled out millions to avail of their right under the said Act. I just want to bring to the public’s attention the guiding principle behind the passing of RA 9006 which is “to ensure equal opportunity for public service xxx among candidates”. The present trend does not, in my opinion, lead to this end for it only renders those who are financially capable to avail of TV ads. As a result, it makes the playing field more uneven among candidates considering that the general Filipino electorate relies on “name recall.” I can’t but ask myself if my country, a land of heroes, has deteriorated in the most deplorable State that maybe even Aristotle can’t imagine to exist in democracy. I will not probably cast my vote again in view of the fact that my vote will never work for the betterment of the country.

3 comments:

melanie said...

The monopoly occurring during campaign periods, be it national or local shows how filthy and beveled our system is, despite the provisions made in our constitution. Individuals who indwell the principles of nobility and justice constantly wage war against political discrimination. Even so, an undermining number of aristocrats deeply threatens mass consciousness. Without an avenue for selection, the last thing Filipinos need is someone who can show them that bipartisan politicians, entertainers, or even gate crashers who suddenly appears waving in front of your house or in a festival, disintegrate loyalty and trust. On the other hand, even if Edmund Burke once said, "The only thing necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing," what goodness lies in us if we are unaware ourselves.

deus ex machina said...

Patronage politics defeats every purpose why elections primarily exist. It spurs among constituents the notion that their vote is worth something valuable. The I'll scratch your back-if-you'll scratch mine thinking is way past the objectivity that is with the principle of reciprocity. In our country's case, a vote's worth stoops down to the most wicked and despising level of immaturity. In the Philippine's a vote's worth could be priced at even a peso just
to gain benefit from it. And why?
Because it's in the innate tradition that is with patronage politics.

melanie said...

The monopoly occurring during campaign periods, be it national or local shows how filthy and beveled our system is, despite the provisions made in our constitution. Individuals who indwell the principles of nobility and justice constantly wage war against political discrimination. Even so, an undermining number of aristocrats deeply threatens mass consciousness. Without an avenue for selection, the last thing Filipinos need is someone who can show them that bipartisan politicians, entertainers, or even gate crashers who suddenly appear waving in front of your house or in a festival, disintegrate loyalty and trust. On the other hand, even if Edmund Burke once said, "The only thing necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing," what goodness lies in us if we are unaware ourselves.